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Tuesday, 15 January 2019

THE UNSPEAKABLE AND DISGRACEFUL GENOCIDE OF AN ENTIRE NATION: "YEMEN: US GRANTS APPROVAL FOR GENOCIDE" + "Yemen Crisis: Why is there a War?"

YEMEN: US GRANTS APPROVAL FOR GENOCIDE

 

EDUCATE!
Above photo: CII Radio.
Note: Thirty-three members of Congress signed a bipartisan letter calling on Secretary of Defense James Mattis to stop a disastrous military assault by Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates on Hodeida, Yemen’s major port city. In the letter, Members called for the U.S. to reject providing logistical, military, and diplomatic support for the Saudi-led coalition’s operation, as well as to disclose the full scope of the U.S. involvement in the Saudi-led war.
“We urge you to use all available means to avert a catastrophic military assault on Yemen’s major port city of Hodeida by the Saudi-led coalition, and to present Congress with immediate clarification regarding the full scope of U.S. military involvement in that conflict,” wrote the Members.“We remind you that three years into the conflict, active U.S. participation in Saudi-led hostilities against Yemen’s Houthis has never been authorized by Congress, in violation of the Constitution.” – KZ
The genocide in Yemen is going to start tomorrow. Eight million are already on the brink of starvation. Eighteen out of twenty-six million Yemenis live in the mountainous heartlands (green) which are under control of the Houthi and their allies. They are surrounded by Saudi and U.A.E. forces and their mercenaries. There is little agriculture. The only supply line from the outside world will soon be cut off. The people will starve.
Even before the war Yemen imported 90% of its staple food. Three years of Saudi/UAE bombing have destroyed local infrastructure and production. The ongoing war has already caused mass starvation and the outbreak of a large cholera epidemic. The Yemeni coast is under blockade by Saudi and U.S. naval forces. The only supplies coming in are UN and commercial deliveries through the Red Sea Hodeidah port (Al Hudaydah on the map).
The United Arab Emirates is leading local mercenaries and Islamist gangs against the Houthi and their allies. During the last months these forces moved from the south along the coast up to Hodeidah. The fighting is fierce:
Heavy fighting in Yemen between pro-government forces and Shiite rebels has killed more than 600 people on both sides in recent days, security officials said Monday.
Tomorrow, when the media will be busy with the Kim-Trump photo-op summit, the UAE forces will launch their attack on the city.
The UN, which oversees the aid distribution through Hodeidah, tried to negotiate between the parties:
The U.N. special envoy for Yemen, Martin Griffiths, traveled to the U.A.E. capital over the weekend in an effort to forestall an attack. Mr. Griffiths had secured an agreement with Houthi rebels who control Hodeidah to allow the U.N. to operate the port jointly, the people said. But people briefed on the discussions said they doubted the U.A.E. would accept the offer or delay the planned assault.
The briefed people were right. The UN is now evacuating its staff:
The United Nations was withdrawing its staff on Monday from the besieged Yemeni port city of Al Hudaydah, after member countries were told that an attack by forces led by the United Arab Emirates was imminent, according to two diplomats briefed on the matter.

The International Committee for the Red Cross removed its staff from the city over the weekend.

Diplomats in the region say they believe that only more pressure from Washington will stop the planned assault.
The U.S., through its Secretary of State Pompeo, just gave a green light to the UAE to launch its attack:
The United States is closely following developments in Hudaydah, Yemen. I have spoken with Emirati leaders and made clear our desire to address their security concerns while preserving the free flow of humanitarian aid and life-saving commercial imports. We expect all parties to honor their commitments to work with the UN Office of the Special Envoy of the Secretary General for Yemen on this issue, support a political process to resolve this conflict, ensure humanitarian access to the Yemeni people, and map a stable political future for Yemen.
Neither the Emirates nor the Saudis have any interest in letting humanitarian aid flow. They are absolutely ruthless. Earlier today they bombed a Cholera treatment center run by Doctors Without Borders:
MSF Yemen @msf_yemen – 10:29 UTC – 11 Jun 2018
“This morning´s attack on an @MSF cholera treatment centre in Abs by the Saudi and Emirati-led coalition shows complete disrespect for medical facilities and patients. Whether intentional or a result of negligence, it is totally unacceptable.”
Last week the Saudis intentionally bombed facilities of the Norwegian Refugee Council in Sanaa:
NRC has provided all relevant parties to the conflict, including the Saudi-led Coalition, with details and coordinates on our operations in order to ensure the safety of our staff.
Hodeidah, with 600,000 regular inhabitants and hundred thousands of refugees, will be difficult to conquer. No supplies will flow through the port while the fight is ongoing. Should the UAE forces be able to take the port they are unlikely to allow aid to pass towards the Houthi controlled areas. There will be a huge famine, hundred thousands if not millions will die.
It would be easy for the Trump administration to stop the UAE attack. U.S. special forces are on the ground in Yemen working closely with UAE forces. U.S. planes are refueling the Saudi and UAE bombers. U.S. intelligence is used in the targeting process. The U.S. supplies the bombs. Without U.S. air-to-air refueling there would be no air-support for the UAE fighters on the ground. They would be unable to launch their attack.
From its very beginning the Trump administration has been extremely close (long read) with the Israeli, Emirati and Saudi rulers. Their common aim is to counter Iran. But Iran is hardly involved in Yemen:
Claims of Iran’s influence over the Houthis have been overblown. While the Houthis do receive some support from Iran, it is mostly political, with minimal financial and military assistance. However, since the Houthis took control of Sanaa, the group has increasingly been portrayed as “Iran-backed” or “Shia,” often suggesting a sectarian relationship with the Islamic Republic. Yet until after the 2011 upheavals, the term “Shia” was not used in the Yemeni public to refer to any Yemeni groups or individuals. The Houthis do not follow the Twelver Shia tradition predominant in Iran, but adhere to the Zaidiya, which in practice is closer to Sunni Islam, and had expressed no solidarity with other Shia communities.
The Saudis see the Zaidiya as an impediment of their influence in Yemen. They want to control the Yemeni government. The Emirates want to control the port of Aden and Yemen’s the oil and gas loading facilities. The Obama administration supported the Saudi onslaught on Yemen to buy Saudi acquiescence with the nuclear deal with Iran. The Trump administration supports the Saudi/UAE war out of lack of knowledge. It has fallen for the Iran myth. It also wants to sell more weapons.
Millions of kids and grown ups will have to pay for this with their lives.



14 Million People On Brink Of Starvation In Yemen | All In | MSNBC



Published on 31 Oct 2018
14 million people are on the brink of starvation in Yemen, but the U.S. can avert disaster if it stops supporting the Saudi war atrocities in Yemen.


Yemen crisis: Why is there a war?


Smoke rises above Sanaa, Yemen following a Saudi-led coalition air strike targeting a Houthi rebel position (31 August 2016)Image copyrightEPA
Image captionMore than 60% of civilian deaths have been the result of Saudi-led air strikes, the UN says

Yemen, one of the Arab world's poorest countries, has been devastated by a civil war. Here we explain what is fuelling the fighting, and who is involved.

How did the war start?


A Houthi rebel fighter mans a checkpoint in Sanaa, Yemen (27 December 2014)Image copyrightAFP
Image captionHouthi rebel fighters entered Sanaa in September 2014 and took full control in January 2015

The conflict has its roots in the failure of a political transition supposed to bring stability to Yemen following an Arab Spring uprising that forced its longtime authoritarian president, Ali Abdullah Saleh, to hand over power to his deputy, Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi, in 2011.
As president, Mr Hadi struggled to deal with a variety of problems, including attacks by jihadists, a separatist movement in the south, the continuing loyalty of security personnel to Saleh, as well as corruption, unemployment and food insecurity.

Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi (L) and Ali Abdullah Saleh (R) address a ceremony at the presidential palace in Sanaa, Yemen (27 February 2012)Image copyrightAFP
Image captionAli Abdullah Saleh (R) was forced to hand over power to Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi (L)

The Houthi movement, which champions Yemen's Zaidi Shia Muslim minority and fought a series of rebellions against Saleh during the previous decade, took advantage of the new president's weakness by taking control of their northern heartland of Saada province and neighbouring areas.
Disillusioned with the transition, many ordinary Yemenis - including Sunnis - supported the Houthis and in late 2014 and early 2015, the rebels took over Sanaa.

Saudi army artillery fire shells towards Yemen from a post close to the Saudi-Yemeni border (13 April 2015)Image copyrightAFP
Image captionA Saudi-led multinational coalition intervened in the conflict in Yemen in March 2015

The Houthis and security forces loyal to Saleh - who is thought to have backed his erstwhile enemies in a bid to regain power - then attempted to take control of the entire country, forcing Mr Hadi to flee abroad in March 2015.
Alarmed by the rise of a group they believed to be backed militarily by regional Shia power Iran, Saudi Arabia and eight other mostly Sunni Arab states began an air campaign aimed at restoring Mr Hadi's government. The coalition received logistical and intelligence support from the US, UK and France.

What's happened since then?




Media captionYemen air strike: The school that's lost 42 children

At the start of the war Saudi officials forecast that the war would last only a few weeks. But almost four years of military stalemate have followed.
Coalition ground troops landed in the southern port city of Aden in August 2015 and helped drive the Houthis and their allies out of much of the south over the next few months. Mr Hadi's government has established a temporary home in Aden, but it struggles to provide basic services and security and the president remains in exile.

Map showing control of Yemen

The Houthis meanwhile have not been dislodged from Sanaa, and have been able to maintain a siege of the third city of Taiz and to fire ballistic missiles across the border with Saudi Arabia.
Militants from al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) and the local affiliate of the rival Islamic State group (IS) have taken advantage of the chaos by seizing territory in the south and carrying out deadly attacks, notably in Aden.



Media captionThe BBC's Nawal Al-Maghafi visits the front line of the Yemen army's battle for the capital of Yemen

The launch of a ballistic missile towards Riyadh in November 2017 prompted the Saudi-led coalition to tighten its blockade of Yemen.
The coalition said it wanted to halt the smuggling of weapons to the rebels by Iran - an accusation Tehran denied - but the restrictions led to substantial increases in the prices of food and fuel, helping to push more people into food insecurity.
In June 2018, the coalition attempted to break the deadlock on the battlefield by launching a major offensive on the rebel-held Red Sea city of Hudaydah, whose port is the principal lifeline for almost two thirds of Yemen's population.



Media captionYemen: Where children rummage through rubbish for food

UN officials warned that the toll in lives might be catastrophic if the port was damaged or blocked. But months passed before the warring parties could be persuaded to attend talks in Sweden to avert an all-out battle in Hudaydah.
In December, government and Houthi representatives agreed to a ceasefire in Hudaydah city and port and promised to redeploy their forces by mid-January.

What's been the human cost?




Media captionThe UN says Yemen is on the brink of the world's worst famine in 100 years if the war continues

In short, the situation in Yemen is, the UN says, the world's worst man-made humanitarian disaster.
The UN says more than 6,800 civilians have been killed and at least 10,700 injured in the fighting since March 2015, with well over half of the casualties caused by Saudi-led coalition air strikes.
An international group tracking the civil war believes the death toll is far higher. The US-based Armed Conflict Location & Event Data Project estimates that more than 60,000 civilians and combatants have been killed since 2016, based on news reports of each incident of violence.



Media captionInside Yemen's industrial-scale prosthetic limb factory

Thousands more civilians have died from preventable causes, including malnutrition, disease and poor health.
The UN's Emergency Relief Co-ordinator, Mark Lowcock, confirmed in December 2018 what he called "Yemen's descent toward famine".
More than 20 million Yemenis - two thirds of the population - are food insecure. Ten million of them are severely food insecure - more than twice the number of four years ago. More than half of Yemen's districts have slipped into "emergency" conditions - one step below famine in the international classification.



Media captionThe sick children trapped by war in Yemen

Almost two million children are currently acutely malnourished, which makes them more vulnerable to disease. The charity Save the Children estimates that 85,000 children with severe acute malnutrition may have died between April 2015 and October 2018.
With only half of the country's 3,500 health facilities fully functioning, at least 16 million people are lacking basic healthcare.
Medics have struggled to cope with the world's largest cholera outbreak, which has resulted in more than 1.2 million suspected cases and 2,500 related deaths since April 2017.
The war has also forced more than 3 million people to flee from their homes, with 2.3 million still displaced.

Why are there rifts among rebel and government forces?


Men inspect an armoured vehicle destroyed in clashes between Houthi rebels and supporters of Ali Abdullah Saleh in Sanaa, Yemen (5 December 2017)Image copyrightREUTERS
Image captionAli Abdullah Saleh died amid fierce clashes between his supporters and the Houthis in Sanaa

The alliance between the Houthis and Mr Saleh collapsed in November 2017 following clashes over control of Sanaa's biggest mosque that left dozens of people dead.
Houthi fighters launched an operation to take full control of the capital and on 4 December 2017 announced that Mr Saleh had been killed.



Media captionAli Abdullah Saleh ruled Yemen for 33 years

Only weeks later, infighting among pro-government forces erupted.
Separatists seeking independence for south Yemen, which was a separate country before unification with the north in 1990, formed an uneasy alliance with troops loyal to Mr Hadi in 2015 to stop the Houthis capturing Aden.
But in January 2018 the separatist movement known as the Southern Transitional Council (STC) accused the Hadi government of corruption and mismanagement, and demanded the removal of the prime minister.

Separatist fighters drive through the southern Yemeni port city of Aden (29 January 2018)Image copyrightREUTERS
Image captionSouthern separatists fought Hadi loyalists after their demand for a cabinet reshuffle was rejected

Clashes erupted when separatist units attempted to seize government facilities and military bases in Aden by force.
The situation was made more complex by divisions within the Saudi-led coalition. Saudi Arabia reportedly backs Mr Hadi, who is based in Riyadh, while the United Arab Emirates is closely aligned with the separatists.
Calm was restored in Aden after a few weeks, but tensions between the two groups remain. In September, there were protests after separatist officials called for a peaceful popular uprising in the South.

Why should this matter for the rest of the world?


Yemenis inspect the site of a suicide car bombing claimed by the Islamic State group on 29 August 2016 at an army recruitment centre in the southern Yemeni city of AdenImage copyrightAFP
Image captionSuicide bombings claimed by the Islamic State group have killed dozens of people in Aden

What happens in Yemen can greatly exacerbate regional tensions. It also worries the West because of the threat of attacks - such as from al-Qaeda or IS affiliates - emanating from the country as it becomes more unstable.
The conflict is also seen as part of a regional power struggle between Shia-ruled Iran and Sunni-ruled Saudi Arabia.
Gulf Arab states - backers of President Hadi - have accused Iran of bolstering the Houthis financially and militarily, though Iran has denied this.
Yemen is also strategically important because it sits on a strait linking the Red Sea with the Gulf of Aden, through which much of the world's oil shipments pass.